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VP stops by Atlanta in latest courting of Georgia voters by Biden administration officials

Vice President Kamala Harris visited Georgia to promote the administration’s economic achievements and underscored the historic growth in Black-owned small businesses and wealth among American families. During her speech, she highlighted “The Stitch,” a project to heal the divisions caused by past urban infrastructure policies, as part of a broader commitment to reconnecting and empowering minority communities.

New EPA rules target Georgia legacy coal-ash ponds

The Environmental Protection Agency has implemented a new rule tightening regulations on coal ash disposal, addressing millions of tons of toxic waste that were previously unregulated and often ended up in unlined ponds and landfills. This significant regulatory step is part of a broader initiative to curb pollutants from power plants and represents a major victory for environmental health, according to Dori Jaffe of the Sierra Club.

Kemp signs bill into law forcing sheriffs to enforce federal immigration law

Gov. Brian Kemp of Georgia signed a contentious new law on May 1, 2024, mandating that law enforcement agencies notify federal authorities about the arrest of undocumented immigrants, with penalties including loss of state funding and criminal charges for non-compliance. Critics argue the law targets Georgia’s Hispanic community disproportionately and contrasts sharply with previous state efforts towards criminal justice reform.

Disability advocates join efforts to halt Atlanta’s ‘Cop City’

When then-Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced plans for a new law enforcement training complex in Dekalb County’s Weelaunee Forest, it sparked widespread opposition under the “Stop Cop City” banner, particularly among disability justice activists who argue the project would disproportionately harm disabled individuals. Nearly three years later, despite ongoing construction of what will be the nation’s largest police training facility, community resistance continues to underscore concerns about the environmental impact, the potential for increased police militarization, and the specific vulnerabilities of the disabled community.

Spoiler alert: Third party candidates aim to give Georgia voters alternatives to Biden and Trump

Jill Stein from the Green Party and Karina Garcia of the Party of Socialism and Liberation, both third-party candidates, participated in a forum in Atlanta, emphasizing their policy agreements on issues like the Israel-Palestine conflict and social funding. While they both announced their respective parties would be on Georgia’s ballot in November, upcoming changes in the state’s election laws could affect their and other third-party candidates’ ability to appear on the ballot.

Emory Hillandale Hospital’s Upgrades

In a significant enhancement to healthcare services in DeKalb County, Emory Hillandale Hospital has unveiled expansive upgrades, demonstrating a remarkable utilization of federal and county funds. Thanks to a substantial $12 million allocation from the American Rescue Plan, championed by DeKalb County CEO Michael Thurmond and other local leaders, the hospital has made critical advancements …

Georgia governor signs school voucher bill to provide $6,500 toward private tuition

Governor Brian Kemp of Georgia signed multiple education bills, including a controversial voucher program allowing parents to use $6,500 in state funds for private schooling or homeschooling of children from low-performing schools. Critics argue this diverts essential resources from public schools and lacks sufficient oversight, while proponents claim it offers necessary educational choices and opportunities.

Earth Day report card: Georgians battle threats to state’s natural wonders year round

Georgia environmentalists mark Earth Day with both celebrations and concerns, as recent policy decisions threaten to undermine the state’s ecological health. Amid ongoing debates, conservation efforts confront challenges from industrial developments and regulatory policies favoring economic interests over environmental preservation.

Rural counties rely on prisons to provide firefighters who work for free

In rural Georgia, incarcerated individuals trained as firefighters and emergency responders are frequently called upon to tackle various emergencies, a practice that began in 1963 and has expanded significantly over the decades. Despite providing crucial support in under-resourced areas, this program faces criticism for potentially exploiting the incarcerated and impacting the job market for professional firefighters.